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PHUMLILE, ‘SWAZI BOLT’ OFF TO RIO OLYMPIC GAMES

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MBABANE – The country’s national record holders in 100m, 200m, 400m; athletics Phumlile Ndzinisa and Sibusiso ‘Swazi Bolt’ Matsenjwa will represent the country in the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games next month.


This would be their second participation in the Olympic Games after the 2012 London games.
The duo was announced yesterday by the Swaziland Olympic and Commonwealth Games Association (SOCGA) Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Muriel Hofer.
The Olympic Games, which are held every after four years, will start on August 5 to the 21 in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Only 34 days are left before the start of the games.


Leading the team will be the National Football Association of Swaziland (NFAS) and SOCGA Vice President Adam ‘Bomber’ Mthethwa; Thoba Mazibuko is the manager while Machawe Mamba is the physiotherapist.
‘Swazi Bolt’ who runs for the Swaziland Royal Police (RSP), will compete in 200m while Manzini Athletics Club (MAC) athlete Phumlile will compete in 100m. Matsenjwa’s personal best in 200m is 20:87 seconds while Ndzinisa’s personal best in the 100m is 11:35 seconds.


In the London 2012 Olympic Games, the country was represented by Ndzinisa, ‘Swazi Bolt’ and swimmer Luke Hall.
“SOCGA is pleased to announce the team to represent the country in the Olympic Games. We are hopeful that the two will perform at their level best and they can break the national records and improve their personal best times,” she said.
Hofer said to produce an athlete for a podium finish for the games like the Olympics Games could cost the country about E3.5 million.


The duo recently represents the country in the 20 CAA  African Senior Championships held in Durban, South Africa where Ndzinisa suffered a hip injury while Matsenjwa did not compete after a false start.

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