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PHILA PROMISES TO BUY KOMBI IF HE WINS

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LUKHETSENI – Elections hopefuls who all hit the campaign trail hoping to woo prospective voters ahead of the Secondary Elections are making all sorts of promises.


Typical of politicians, they are making all sorts of promises as they try to convince the electorate to vote for them.
Some of the promises seem feasible while others appear to be far-fetched.


One candidate who has made a host of promises to the electorate is Matsanjeni North MP candidate, Phila Buthelezi.
The former legislator, who is seeking a second term, has promised to purchase a kombi for the electorate if he wins the elections. “The kombi will be used for various things, including titsinjana (traditional ceremony where a bride is returned to her in-laws after being tekaed) and church services,” he told prospective voters under Lukhetseni Umphakatsi.

He did not elaborate whether he would fulfil his promise immediately after getting into office or at a later stage, perhaps towards the end of the term. The soft-spoken former legislator also promised the electorate that he would not take back the vehicle he bought for the Inkhundla in 2013.


Immediately after his surprise victory in 2013, Buthelezi delivered a van to the constituency. He told Lukhetseni residents that he would not take back the vehicle even if he loses the elections on September 21.
“The vehicle will continue to be a property of the Inkhundla even if a new administration takes over,” he promised.
Buthelezi, who hails from Mambane Umphakatsi, is up against three formidable contestants in the final round.
These are: Nkululeko Mbhamali, a former MP for the constituency who served two terms and Sikelela ‘Tholeni’ Mbhamali, a retired police Assistant Commissioner. Another strong candidate is Vusi Ndzabandzaba, a young businessman whose campaign has focused mainly on young people.

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